We need your help to raise funds for MOLE!

by MOLE in London, England, United Kingdom

We need your help to raise funds for MOLE!

Total raised £1,310

raised so far

34

supporters

We need to raise enough money for our short film, MOLE so we can complete post-production and submit it to festivals.

by MOLE in London, England, United Kingdom

We have the footage! We have the team! Now we just need a bit of help to complete post-production and launch our film into the festival circuit.

1669323702_1669323678836.png

Following an arrest for drunk-driving at the finale of a messy night out, a woman in her tumultuous mid-twenties decides to end the party and just… be better. How? By raiding her mum’s wardrobe, finding a “sensible” partner, seeking that one friend who has everything “sorted” and taking the job she hates more seriously.

1669324166_car_scene_-_mole_shock.jpeg

  1669323702_1669323678737.png

Why do women have to do so much to fit anywhere?

Mole explores obsessive tendencies that women often find themselves perpetuating: trying to be perfect and always seeing something through to the end, even if it leads to self-destruction. So much is asked of us: by society, culture, our families, our bodies. This short is an interrogation of that. Without prompting, our protagonist tries to ‘fix’ a natural mid-twenties crisis by committing herself to things she has been told she should want. We see her be led by those closest to her to a possibility of balance, only to reject it. The product is someone who sees a measured approach as shying away from something difficult.

This is the disease most women have in trying to make space for themselves: if you’re going to do it, do it properly and do it yourself, even if it compromises your happiness and mental health.

1669324150_a003c005_220506d3_capture11.jpg

1669323675_1669323675439.png

Being a woman isn’t perfect, and you don't need me or the media to tell you so.

Still, if I took mainstream TV’s word for it, the only women who can have problems are the rich and gaudy with their superficial and unbelievable issues. (Unbelievable because the prerequisite to procuring such a problem is unattainable and therefore ridiculous.) OR, those strong business types. You know the ones. Will she get the deal done while dealing with family issues and - god-forbid - a man who’s fawning over her?

That's where films come in.

That's where MOLE comes in.

Because Mole isn’t that. Mole could never be that. Maybe Mole even wishes those were her problems and would happily take them on, because then it’d give her some idea of identity. Of who she is. Of who, or what, she wants to be.

I was drawn to this project because I love troubled women. Not out of pity. Out of relatability.

Especially troubled women who just can’t hack it being anything other than unapologetically themselves. But, with Mole, there was a twist - something that hooked me. You can’t help but wonder… Is she being herself? Is she discovering? Creating? Forcing it?

Or does she live in the space of reinventing? In a constant cycle to get it right?

A death and rebirth.

Death and rebirth.

Death.

Rebirth.

And if that’s ever felt like you… then this short film is for you.

Thank you for your support.

        1669323702_1669323680262.png

1669323702_1669323678376.png

Shari Sharpe - Director & Producer 

Shari Sharpe is a director and writer who brings unapologetic humour and an international lens to her work. She capped off a long academic career, where she earned a BA, an MSc and an MA, by saying "sod it all" and completing a certificate in Screenwriting at UCLA Extension.

Shari’s nomadic lifestyle coupled with her experiences as a British woman of Jamaican descent have deeply influenced her voice as a filmmaker. Her work explores themes of identity, belonging, and double consciousness, while tackling the invisible yet inherent truths of interracial relationships and blended families. Intersectionality, authorship, and gaze play an important role in how she constructs her narratives and brings scripts to life, in an effort to make the audience more self-critical about their expectations with storytelling.

Shari’s pilot WHITE BOYS was the Pilot Winner of the 2020 ScreenCraft Comedy Contest, and her FLEABAG spec placed 2nd in UCLA X's TV Spec Competition. She's also had the pleasure of writing three TV features for the Hallmark Channel.

 

1669323690_1669323676115.png

Cara Mahoney - Writer, Executive Producer & Cast 

Cara is an actor, writer and producer based in London. She studied English (MA), followed by Writing for Performance (MLitt), both at the University of St Andrews. She then trained as an actor at The Oxford School of Drama. As an actor, Cara's screen credits include Fantastic Beasts: The Secrets of Dumbledore (Warner Bros.), Playing Nice (StudioCanal), I Wonder What's Keeping My True Love Tonight (Featherside Films) and Scenes from the Life of a Priest (Wolf At The Door Productions). Theatre credits include The Importance of Being Earnest (European Arts Company), We Need to Talk About Bobby (Off Eastenders) (Paperback Theatre) and Shudder (Soho Theatre).

Her written work explores themes of identity, gender and sexuality. As a student, Cara's four-hander, Apathy and Hysteria, was showcased as part of SAND (St Andrews New Drama Festival) and her radio play, Shell Rock Tango, premiered on St Andrews Radio. An extract from her one-woman show, Desk Chairs and Canvas Bags, was presented as part of a scratch night put together by Flawstate Theatre. Mole is her first produced screenplay.

Cara is represented by Soundcheck.

1669323702_1669323678270.png

Molly Keogh - Creator, Producer & Cast 

Molly is a self-represented actor who trained at The Oxford School of Drama now living in London. This will be her debut as a filmmaker. Molly's short film credits include PASS (J. Smith Productions), What is a Crobbler? (Grizzly Bear Productions) and BOX CALL (Omar Elhanbouly). A selection of her theatre credits include: OFFIE and Broadway World nominated, Working for Crumbs (The Space Theatre), A Little Rain in Monaco (The Pleasance Theatre) and Again and Again and Again (Southwark Playhouse). This film is very close to Molly's heart and she is thankful for any help you can give so that this story can be brought to life. 

   1669323701_1669323677658.png

Yonic Productions Ltd is a female-led, London based production company dedicated to telling women’s stories while creating opportunities for women in film. Founded by actor, writer and filmmaker Cara Mahoney, Yonic Productions is a platform for the stories that are so often ignored or included as subplots.

‘Yonic’ means ‘In the shape of a vulva or yoni.' Another dictionary states, ‘of or relating to a yoni [the female genitalia as a divine symbol of sexual pleasure]'.

No one knows what this means, whereas the male equivalent, ‘phallic’ is commonly accepted and used. And that’s not because vulvic images don’t feature in art, architecture, nature, advertising; it’s because it’s not something we feel comfortable commenting on, and perhaps largely it doesn’t even occur to us. ‘Yonic’ barely features in dictionaries- it has been removed from our vernacular, something which acts as a totem for the erasure of women. Yet women are literally everywhere. We’re here to reclaim the narrative, one story at a time.

https://www.yonicproductions.com/

1669323701_1669323677811.png

Mole is dark comedy. It is a bildungsroman that feels like it should end in a breath of hope but doesn’t. The visual style will oscillate between vibrant energy and pallid stasis according to where our protagonist’s heart is at each moment.

This short goes from the peaks of drunken bliss to the pallor of despair. Much like Another Round, we see and feel this journey of confusion with our protagonist. The warmth of aggressive colour quickly devolves into the light of dawn that echoes with regret from the night before.

Mole’s tale of uncertainty comes with a playful self-awareness leading us to a dark but not dismal comedy, like that of Girls, Crashing and Fleabag. It’s as if we’ve taken Black Books and have interrogated Bernard Black’s mental health, losing neither bleakness nor comedy.

With the pace and playfulness of Hot Fuzz but the muted tones of Sweetheart, Mole treads the line between action and arthouse. The juxtaposition of genres matches that of our protagonist’s ill-defined identity. Although we are with Mole for the duration of the short, honing in on her every movement, we are not with her. As with Guilt, there is an element of the voyeur. It’s as if we shouldn’t be there at all. We are caught up in the speed of her impulses but stay with her long enough that we feel uncomfortable for her wellbeing.

1669324236_a003c017_220507v8_capture12.jpg

  1669323701_1669323678498.png

And so, in order to make this all come together we are going to need the help of our fantastic supporters!  We're looking to raise £4,000 to make this dream a reality. The pie chart below outlines where the money will go:

1670775500_1670775500018.png

1669324382_a003c011_2205060y_capture9.jpg     

1669323702_1669323679072.png

If you are unable to support us financially then not to worry, as there are other ways you can help! You can:

- Share this page

- Follow us on our socials - share, like & comment - we'd love to hear from you!

          Twitter: @Mole_film

          Instagram: @molefilm

          Facebook: @molefilm

- You can also follow the production company!

          Twitter: @YonicProduction

          Instagram: @yonicproductionsltd

We really appreciate any help you can give and so thank you from the bottom of our hearts!

1669324289_a010c016_2205099p_capture20.jpeg

Show your support

Payment and personal details are protected