Protection Approaches

A Community project United Kingdom

No one deserves to be attacked because of who they are. Help us build a global movement to end identity-based violence worldwide.

New stretch target

Thank you! We are absolutely delighted to have reached our baseline target of £5000! This is so exciting and we're incredibly moved by all your support! But we still need your help to reach £10,000. With £10,000 our projects will have greater impact and make more lasting change; it will mean that we'll be able to start our workshops with some of the UK's most influential decision makers, and that we can begin our international campaign to improve responses from the United Nations to ethnic cleansing, war crimes and genocide.

So please, please, please keep supporting us and asking your family, friends and colleagues to do the same. The more we raise the more we will be able to achieve. No one deserves to be attacked because of who they are.

To find out exactly what your pledge means please read the "what we can achieve with your support" section.

Much love from the Protection Approaches team

In short:

Identity-based violence occurs every day, it destroys lives and communities all around the world and results in suffering, death and destruction on a scale equal to the world’s worst diseases. Yet we know it is preventable. We have formed Protection Approaches because we believe a new approach is needed to strengthen the efforts already underway to tackle this global cancer. We are asking you to support us in that mission. Nobody should have to live in fear of attack simply because of who they are.

Protection Approaches is a new non-profit organisation registered as a company limited by guarantee: 09304012


We are delighted to have Carl's support. You can find out more about Carl’s work and amazing story here

Our advisors

We are backed by some of the leading experts in prediction, prevention, protection and justice approaches to identity-based violence. They have agreed to lend us their expertise and provide advice on our projects. This helps us to ensure all our work is informed and meaningful.

Understanding identity violence

When anybody is attacked because of their gender, sexual orientation, political affiliation, disability, race, culture, religion, or ethnicity, this is identity-based violence. It is not something particular to any culture, region or religion but something that most of us have seen or ourselves been a victim of.

It is identity-based violence when a person is beaten up on the streets of London for being gay, black, a Muslim or disabled. It is identity-based violence when a European neo-Nazi gang stabs a person because they are an immigrant. It is identity-based violence when Islamist extremists commit murder because they believe their victims to be enemies of their warped ideology. It is identity-based violence when a Rohingya Muslim is lynched by a mob in Burma/Myanmar as part of ongoing, systematic persecution of Rohingya people. It is identity-based violence when entire villages are razed to the ground in Darfur and their inhabitants murdered and raped by Janjaweed militias colluding with the Sudanese government. It was identity-based violence when 6 million Jews were killed in the Holocaust, and it was identity-based vilonce in Bosnia in 1992, and in Rwanda in 1994.

Nobody is born believing it OK to violently attack a person because of their identity. People who commit crimes like these do not do so because they are inherently more evil than anybody else or because their culture or religion is uniquely barbaric. Those who commit these crimes do so because they have learnt their prejudice and behaviour through a number of recognisable processes. All identity-based violence, wherever it occurs is caused by some or all of these processes – if we tackle these processes we will end the violence!

Some people become prejudiced because they have grown up around friends and family who have taught them to discriminate; this is just as true for a British person taught to hate gay people as it is for a Burmese person taught to hate Rohingya Muslims. Some learn their prejudices at school, from the media, through political groups, or religious institutions.

We know that when governments, judiciaries, the media, civil society, and the international community do not stand up to discrimination against a group but instead ignore or even collude in it, the group facing prejudice will become increasingly marginalised from the rest of society. Through misrepresentation, hate speech and dehumanisation the group being discriminated against are seen as an enemy and not as a human beings. Dehumanisation legitimises prejudice and violence, whether on the individual level or the level of the state.

We know too that once a group is at risk of attack, bystanders - those not involved in the violence – have a responsibility to protect them. This is just as much the case when Islamaphobic hate crimes rise in London as it is when opposing Christian anti-Balaka militias and Muslim Seleka militias attack men, women and children in Central Africa Republic.

Protection Approaches has been founded because these processes are not widely understood or effectively tackled. We believe that we must stop viewing acts of identity-based violence as individual crises and instead understand it as a shared but preventable global phenomenon.

We work to build this understanding and to promote the mechanisms and practices that can predict and prevent identity-based violence and protect those at risk. We use research, workshops and visual media to increase knowledge amongst decision makers and decision shapers of these processes and the ways in which the processes can be effectively addressed. By building understanding we also increase the will to address these issues. Through targeted advocacy we work to develop a sense of shared responsibility, so that one day nobody in the world will need to live in fear of becoming a victim.

We’re new, but we believe we’ve got the vision & experience to make a real difference–we’ve got a team of advisors behind us who represent some of the world’s leading experts in the field. Now we just need your help.


What we will achieve with your support

We have set our funding target at £5,000. It is vital we raise this figure to secure the future of Protection Approaches and our fight against identity-based violence. It will allow us to guarantee the launch of our first projects, apply for charity status and have time to engage with international donors to ensure long term funding.

If we reach our £5,000 target we will be absolutely delighted, however once the target is reached our work is not done, please keep backing us! To be fully operational and launch all our projects we will need to raise £155,000 in 2015!

If we raise £5,000:

It is vitally important that we raise £5,000 as it will ensure that Protection Approaches is able to operate for six months during which we will:

  • Undertake our Election 2015 project: An assessment of the election pledges of the five main UK political parties to assess the effect they would have on tackling identity-based violence in the UK and around the world. The findings will be published in a report shortly before polling day.
  • Launch our building responsibility project: This project is designed to increase understanding amongst decision makers, decision shapers and the wider public of the root causes of identity-based violence, and how these causes can be effectively addressed. If we raise £5,000 we will be able to launch the project with a viral video competition for young film makers. The competition will call for short viral videos demonstrating the processes that cause identity-based violence with cash prizes for the winners.
  • Apply to become a charity – It is really important to us to become a registered charity. Not only will this open up lots of fundraising opportunities to us, but it is also a way for us to demonstrate the value of our work.
  • Engage with international donor organisations: Over the 6 months that £5,000 will allow us to operate we will engage with international donor organisations helping us to ensure the our future.

If we raise £10,000:

If we could reach a target of £10,000 it would be fantastic. We would be able to achieve everything we could with £5,000 and it would allow us to achieve even more:

  • Promotion for Election 2015 project: With £10,000 we would be able to promote the findings of our election project through viral videos and infographics on social media. This would make the impact of the project far, far greater
  • Building responsibility project workshops: With £10,000 we will be able to run our first 2 workshops as part of the building responsibility project. These day-long workshops, in partnership with the Wiener Library in London, will each bring together 20 decision shapers such as journalists, NGOs, online commentators, and politicians from the national and local level, in order to build understanding and develop personal responsibility through dynamic discussions and activities. Working with historical sources from the media archive of Nazi Germany, housed by the Wiener Library, workshops will encourage a holistic conceptualisation to processes of scapegoating, fear-mongering, exclusion, hate crime and hate speech, drawing upon contemporary comparisons from the UK and Europe.

If we raise £20,000:

With £20,000 we would be able to achieve everything already listed, but then achieve so, so much more:

  • Building responsibility project new media campaign: With £20,000 we can launch our new media campaign working with some of the UK’s best video producers, artists, and photographers we will develop viral videos, and innovative infographics to engage with untraditional audiences and build online understanding of how prejudice is formed and where it leads
  • Launch UN Security Council veto campaign: The current structure of the UN Security Council and of its permanent members (Russia, China, USA, France, and the United Kingdom) can stymie efforts to protect lives. The decisions by Russia and China to use their veto in relation to Resolutions over Syria indicate a serious flaw in the international system. With £20,000 Protection Approaches will begin a targeted campaign focussed on decision shapers and decision makers to raise awareness of the possibilities for UNSC reform and broaden UK and European debate.

Our theory of change:

Our theory of change diagram is really important to us. It is one of our founding documents that informs all of our work. It sets out exactly how we will continue the fight against identity-based violence around the world.

In simple terms, a theory of change is a map demonstrating how to get from the current situation to a desired future. our theory of change sets out all the activities we will undertake to get us to a future of a world free from identity-based violence.

The best way to view our theory of change is to start with the problem at the bottom of the diagram and work your way up. If you need any help understanding any of the terms of abbreviations there is a key on the cover page.

Click the image to view.

Our Team:

We may be new but we believe we have a team with the passion, experience and ideas to make a huge difference. We just need you to believe in us!


Kate Ferguson: Kate is responsible for our Political Engagement Strategy, which includes developing working groups and networks of decision makers in the UK and abroad. She leads our Research and Analysis department. Kate is an experienced policy analyst and researcher.

Kate has over seven years of academic and professional experience in genocide   studies   and   atrocity   prevention.   Before   founding   Protection Approaches, she worked as a Policy Consultant and Political Advisor in mass atrocity prevention.

Kate is completing her PhD at the University of East Anglia on devolved structures of identity-based violence. She teaches undergraduate classes in gender, sexual violence, and the international justice system.

Andy Fearn: Andy runs our campaigns and broad engagement programmes. He is responsible for the full cycle project management and monitoring and evaluation of our work. Andy is an experienced campaigns and project manager with a successful record of fundraising.

Before founding Protection Approaches, Andy worked with genocide prevention NGO Aegis  Trust  where  he  redesigned the organisation’s youth department in the UK and in Rwanda. In the UK, Andy developed new programmes that engage school-age children and university students with issues of prejudice, mass atrocities, and genocide, and trained students in issue-based campaigning. In Rwanda he designed and launched national youth programmes funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency and the UK Department for International Development. The programmes focus on peace-building and upstream mass atrocity prevention through youth leadership training, sports and arts.

Principal Strategy advisor:

Horacio Trujillo: Formerly Director of Research at Humanity United, the world’s leading philanthropic foundation dedicated to the prevention of genocide and mass atrocities, Horacio is a University professor and advisor to humanitarian programs worldwide. He has led the development of the programs of study in international development and human security in the Department of World Affairs at Occidental College, where he currently teaches on Leadership in the Public and Private Spheres.


Informal Advisory Group:

We are backed by some of the leading experts in prediction, prevention, protection and justice approaches to identity-based violence and identity-based mass violence. They have agreed to lend us their expertise and offer us advice on our projects. This helps us to ensure all our work is informed and meaningful.


Charlotte Clapham: Charlotte contributes to our blog with a focus on identity-based mass violence around the world. She holds a BA in History and MA in Politics, specialising in conflict and genocide studies, from the University of Sheffield. She currently works for an international NGO and is responsible for engaging schools across the UK in global citizenship and positive social action. Previously Charlotte managed training programmes for young people empowering them to prevent identity-based violence through advocacy, campaigning and public speaking. Her interests lie in the broad areas of atrocity prevention and identity based violence, specifically with a focus on gender.

James Coldwell: James contributes to our blog with a focus on UK political affairs. He holds an MPhil in Modern European History from Cambridge University and a BA in History and French from the University of York. He has been involved with research and analysis in the City of London since 2010 and has been involved in numerous campaigns for political issues and charitable causes during that time.