Ngalawa Cup and Cool Aid Charity

The greatest sailing race of all time between Tanzania and Zanzibar! On top of that, there is the large donation towards a charity too!

Unfortunately, this project was not successful

The Ngalawa cup is a sailing dream for me but has finnacial implication I simply cannot afford. However, the money i raise will also be going towards an environmental charity called Cool Earth

The Charity:

Local people stand to lose the most from deforestation but the most to gain from its protection. As such, they are the forest’s best possible custodians. That’s why all Cool Earth partnerships are community-owned and led – an approach that research is continually proving to be the most effective way to keep rainforest standing.

By developing local livelihoods, our mission is to end the cycle of deforestation entrenching villages into further poverty. Creating strong, self-determining communities – not dependency.

We are also the only charity that works solely where the threat to the forest is greatest, on the frontline of deforestation. And each of our partnerships forms a shield to make the neighbouring forest inaccessible to loggers – saving millions of acres of further forest.

The race:

You'll race for up to seven days depending on how fast you are. The racecourse opens at 06:30 and closes at 17:30 with time penalties for being late to shore. Sailing is not allowed after dark but trust us, you’ll be ready for a rum by the fire by dusk. 

The racecourse is made up of a series of compulsory checkpoints and a couple of sections for free-sailing where you will have to choose your own overnight spot. You'll be roughing it on uninhabited islets, camping on islands with inquisitive locals or staying in an actual bed in a fishing village. Bring a hammock. 

The islands are lush and green, surrounded by pristine white sand beaches and teeming coral reefs. You'll see a bunch of exotic beasts: barracuda, dolphins and manta rays to name a few. Inland there are monkeys and more exotic birds and butterflies than anyone needs. 

Zanzibar has plenty of beach bars and party spots, but for the most part its attraction is down to having plenty of places that feel remote and wild. Its main exports include Freddie Mercury and spices. If you were looking for a place to stock up on nutmeg, cloves and peppercorns, Zanzibar is your place. 

Kilwa is often overlooked by the standard Tanzanian tourist. You are no ordinary tourist though so you'll appreciate the lack of backpackers, friendly welcome, stunning views and excellent sailing. It's much quieter than Zanzibar, in a good way, but you can still find budget guest houses or camping right through to luxury hill-side chalets.