Kabubu

In July 2016, I am going to be part of a project which takes 30 students from Willingdon Community School to Uganda. Whilst out there we...

 

In July 2016, I am going to be part of a project which takes 30 students from Willingdon Community School to Uganda. Whilst out there we hope to build a house for a teacher to live in the small rural village of Kabubbu. We will also take part in Development Projects; visiting families, assessing their needs, and providing the most basic of essentials for survival e.g. mosquito nets, bedding, water butts, agricultural tools and seeds etc. In addition, we will teach in the primary and secondary schools, run assemblies, and provide desperately needed teaching resources. Working with our trip doctor, some of our students who are planning medical careers will help in the local medical centre, and visit and assess Aids patients.

 

As well as helping and working with the residents of Kabubbu, our aim is to provide students with the opportunity to learn about global issues first hand. Students develop skills in cultural awareness, communication, leadership, and teamwork, whilst developing a close partnership with a local community in Africa. Working in Kabubbu is extremely challenging, physically, mentally and emotionally. Students return home with a new-found confidence, an appreciation of how much we have in our society, and the satisfaction of having worked very hard to help improve the lives of others. They carry this experience into their future lives and careers, enhancing their ability to contribute to our society too.

 

About Kabubbu

Kabubbu is a large village spread across bush in central southern Uganda. The village is missing a generation, due partly to the AIDS virus and other illnesses such as Cholera, Typhoid and Malaria. Whole groups of children are growing up in incomplete families. Often grandparents are taking the role of parents at the age of 80+. There is no state pension, no free education, no social services, nor a national health service and, basically, if residents cannot provide food for yourself, or money for medicines, they die. The Quicken Trust have set up, and fund, a primary and secondary school, health centre, sponsorship programmes, farming initiatives, tourism project and other ventures in order to provide the village with an infra-structure so that eventually the people of Kabubbu may be able to support themselves.

To raise money for this wonderful project, I'm running the Brighton half marathon on 28th February. Please donate for this amazing cause.

 

Thank you

 

Eileen

 

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