Haiku to Make Love to

Haiku to Make Love to

Haiku to F*ck aims to create an anthology of sexuality and a celebration of the human body which showcases the work of local artists.

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Haiku to Make Love to is an anthology of sexuality and a celebration of the human body which looks to explore the many facets of sex, sexuality, sensuality and the imperfect. The anthology will be a collection of Haiku that highlights aspects of sexuality, asexuality, intimacy, gender, romance and societal views. 

Spark The Word Press knows that having an anthology like this in the world is important because sexuality is broader than sexual activity.  It encompasses all the things that make us who we are. Shaped by culture, history, values, education and experience, our sexuality influences our views of individuality, family, parenthood, and community. In our society sex is just not an acceptable topic for conversation. To be silent about sex keeps us ignorant and it's vitally important that we talk openly about sex as a society, preferably starting at school level. 
Having sex is an extremely intimate act; we can feel very vulnerable and uneasy, and find it difficult to have a dialogue. Fear of rejection, not performing well enough, body insecurities or anxiety about disclosing an unusual sexual desire can stop us from communicating freely.

Researching this subject I came across a TED talk presented by sex educator Debby Herbenick from the Kinsey Institute of Sex, titled Make Sex Normal. By "normal" she means making sex, bodies and gender, ordinary parts of every conversation. She believes if people are more comfortable talking about sex, they will be more in touch with their own sexuality and be able to discuss their sexual likes, dislikes and boundaries with their romantic partners.

Herbenick says: "Too many of us don't know how to talk about sex and sexual health on a personal level, with partners, our children, physicians or friends. As a result, relationships and health can suffer and important information doesn't get to the people who need it.

"We need to make sure that people, especially young people, have access to good accurate information, and we need to promote tolerant, inclusive attitudes towards everyone regardless of their sexual preferences or orientation."

She would like to encourage people to talk about sex like "it's not a big deal"; and I can't agree more.